Tag Archive | dahlia

Six on Saturday: April 14

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Saturday has rolled around again and it's time for another six.  The Propagator is the excellent host of this meme and if you would like to see what everyone else is doing in their garden this weekend, do pay a visit to his site.

We were  kept busy watering during the week. One of the good things about so much dryness is that there are fewer weeds to bother about, except perhaps the dreadful euphorbia maculata, or spotted spurge which isn't fazed by anything the weather throws at it. I think it could grow through cement under a blowtorch.

But last night we had a thunderstorm which brought us 13 ml of rain and it was lovely to look out into the garden this morning and see the last drops of water shimmering in the sun before a breeze arrived to shake them gently to the ground.

Here are my six for this week:

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  1. An unidentified dahlia given to me  in a bag of other unidentified dahlia tubers by a friend.  I've waited ages for any of them to flower and this is the first (and perhaps only) one to cooperate.  It isn't one of the flouncy attention-seeking dahlias, but I do like its neat and orderly petals with their hints of gold in the centres.
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2. My peace rose.  Yes, I know I've shown it before, but not this particular photo, and I do love it. I think it's looking particularly fetching in the early morning sunshine. Look at those peachy-pinky gelato colours!

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3.  I wonder what this strange fungus is that appeared in the garden the other morning?  It reminds me of tripe.

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4. The flower of Hakea Petiolaris,  just emerging from its bud on the left and fully open on the right.  It's also called the ' sea urchin' hakea. The leaves are leathery and a strange greyish-green  and  the tree carries its seed pods from the previous year until it's prompted to open them, usually by a bush fire, not unlike other Australian trees such as the Banksia. I hope the seed pods won't be opening here.

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5. Beautiful little garnet berries on the Berberis Thunbergii atropurpurea. These little gems could almost hang on a necklace or be clustered together on an earring.  When the cold weather arrives, the colours on the plant will be even more intense.

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6.  Part of my front garden: dry but still coping and cunningly photographed so the neighbouring houses can't be seen-we are living in the suburbs, after all. You can see Sedum, Salvia 'Greek Skies', Perovskia,  dwarf Chrysanthemums, and Agastache 'Sweet Lili', amongst others.

 

Weather today: Sunny, slightly cloudy, and windy- a bit of everything. 15-26 C.

 

Six on Saturday, March 24: Bloomin’ Bright

This morning I took a trip around my neighbourhood to look see what's in flower. Surprisingly there isn't a great deal as many gardens look a trifle tired after the extreme heat and dryness of summer, but Autumn is a very good time to see glorious natives in flower, so I've added some of them to my six this week.

As well, you can zip over to The Propagator's site to see more of what's happening in other people's gardens.

1. Eucalyptus erythrocorys  'Red Cap Gum'.  The red parts top the flowers before they emerge.  What a colour contrast!

1. Eucalyptus erythrocorys 'Red Cap Gum'. The red parts top the flowers before they emerge. What a colour contrast!

2. Corymbia ficifolia.  These eucalypts are grafted, so they grow very well SE Australia.  The bees love them as you can see, and when I turned one corymb towards me to take a photo, nectar poured out, so birds love them too.

2. Corymbia ficifolia. These eucalypts are grafted, so they grow very well SE Australia. The bees love them as you can see, and when I turned one corymb towards me to take a photo, nectar poured out, so it's easy to understand why birds love them too.

3. Eucalyptus Leucoxylon  var. macrocarpa  This eucalyptus is common in  the Central Tablelands area, is easy to grow and flowers prolifically.

3. Eucalyptus Leucoxylon var. macrocarpa:  This eucalyptus is common in the Central Tablelands area, is easy to grow and flowers prolifically.

4. The double  oleander in my garden
4. The double oleander in my garden

I wrote about this oleander in my post The Humble Oleander.  At the time I was trying to grow my oleander as a tree rather than a shrub, because I want the sun to be able to shine into the garden.  It's been a battle! The oleander is quite determined to be a shrub: it sends out shoots around its trunk and I remove them.   But it's now about twice the size that it was when I wrote the post, and is developing into a pleasing shape.

5. Rosa 'The Prince'  Grown from a cutting.
5. Rosa 'The Prince' Grown from a cutting.
6. Eucalyptus Caesia.   A bit of relief from so much pink and red!  This WA eucalyptus  is rather hard to grow on the eastern side of Australia. Its flowers were finished, but the silvery gumnuts are very beautiful too.

6. Eucalyptus Caesia. A bit of relief from so much pink and red! This WA eucalyptus is rather hard to grow on the eastern side of Australia. Its flowers were finished, but the silvery gumnuts are very beautiful too.