Tag Archive | Pyrus

Bounteous: SoS September 29

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It was like snow in my garden this morning!  White Pyrus petals were drifting, tossed here and there by the breeze, flurried across the garden and coming to rest, eventually, on the lawn.

Almost overnight, it seems, Spring has really arrived, and I am in an unusual quandary: that of having many plants to choose for this week's Six on Saturday.  Each week gardeners join to present six things from their garden to showcase.  The Propagator is the host of this popular meme, so do visit his site to see what gardeners from all over the world are doing.

Here are the finalists in my 'personal six competition'  for this week:

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One:  Crabapple, Malus floribunda.  This tree has been in the garden about three years and hasn't been in a hurry to grow.  It's a very odd shape, but then perhaps that is common to the species.  It's flinging its fat flowery arms  into the blue sky as if shouting, 'Hallelujah, Spring is here!'

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Two:  Only recently have I become aware of this plant, thanks to Northern Hemisphere blogging friends-you know who you are.  I've never been very fond of orange shades in the garden, but I am in thrall to this Geum 'Totally Tangerine' which I planted recently.  I find the colour mesmerising and the shape beauteous.  I've planted three, and though there have been whispers of slight thuggishness from some quarters, at this stage I am watching its development with delight and hoping it will fill up empty spaces in the garden.

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Three: Ranunculus No ID.  I planted some bulbs a few years ago and they have spread themselves around the garden in a very satisfying way.  I sometimes think they are somewhat looked down upon by gardeners for being a bit too ordinary, but I love them- trouble free and undemanding, they seem to be ignored by snails too. These white ones are delicately tinged by the last rays of the sun and  I'm mesmerised by their beauty every time I see them.

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Four: The aforementioned Pyrus, an inherited tree, one of five.  I don't know its name, but its columnar shape seems to suggest calleryna 'Capital' or 'Chanticleer'.

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Five: Continuing with a bit of a white theme here, this is Rodanthemum.  Is it hosmariense?  I'm not sure, but I particularly like the feathery grey foliage and the mass of flowers.  It grows very well from cuttings too- always an added bonus.

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Six: Was it because we had a very cold winter that my cabbages and broccoli were so slow to mature?  I don't know, but here they are, ready to be eaten just when we're beginning to think  about salads! Not only do they look very healthy, but they've been ignored by white butterflies and are almost free of caterpillar holes.  It's of some concern to me that I've seen so few white butterflies: I feel it's a portentous sign of the ills that are besetting our climate and the damage being caused to our insect populations.

Sorry to end on a low note.  That's my six for this week.  Do look at what others are doing in their gardens and happy gardening everyone.

Weather today: 10-18C and sunny.